From New York Magazine's Q&A with Tavi:

How would you describe the tone of Rookie?
A lot of websites run on a system of having to get a post up every half-hour, and a lot of those end up being filler posts because they don't actually have that much to say. Rookie is kind of my response to that because we have three posts a day, and we plan everything a month ahead of time. And I like that. After being in all these meetings with publishing companies and advertisers and stuff, it's like everyone just wants to trick people into reading their website. If the content is good, people will read it — you don't have to create some funny little "trying to be cutesy" gadget or whatever to coax them. We don't really have snappy names for our categories, they're pretty straightforward: "Movies and TV," "Sex and Love." I guess a couple of the more abstract ones would be "Eye Candy," which is a photo story by one of our photographers, or "Dear Diary," in which four of our contributors submit a diary entry each week.

And what about the content?
A lot of websites run on a system of having to get a post up every half-hour, and a lot of those end up being filler posts because they don't actually have that much to say. Rookie is kind of my response to that because we have three posts a day, and we plan everything a month ahead of time. And I like that. After being in all these meetings with publishing companies and advertisers and stuff, it's like everyone just wants to trick people into reading their website. If the content is good, people will read it — you don't have to create some funny little "trying to be cutesy" gadget or whatever to coax them. We don't really have snappy names for our categories, they're pretty straightforward: "Movies and TV," "Sex and Love." I guess a couple of the more abstract ones would be "Eye Candy," which is a photo story by one of our photographers, or "Dear Diary," in which four of our contributors submit a diary entry each week.

And it seems some older people are intimidated by those who are using technology in all these new ways.

I think there's this scrambling — that for people to feel like they're a relevant or interesting person they have to be spouting out one-liners on Twitter every couple of hours. It's really interesting how people, how the world, is trying to figure out what it means to have an extension of our identity, or a whole new identity, online. And it's a really unique situation where, for once, it's something that young people understand better than adults in a lot of ways, or are more used to it. But it's such this scary powerful thing.